5.2.19

047


STAND. 0 / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9
RUN. / 0. / 1. / 2. / 3. / 4. / 5. / 6. / 7. / 8. / 9. - - - - - - - - - - - -
[numbers, see original]

[7. Inscribed on all Burgs]
[7a. Before the Bad Times]
[5] THÀT STÉT VP ALLE BURGUM ESKRÉVEN. This is inscribed on all burgs:
ÉR THÉRE ÀRGE TID KÉM. WAS VS LAND THÀT SKÉNNESTE IN WRALDA. SVNNE RÉS HAGER AND THÉR WAS SJELDEN FROST. ANDA BÁMA ÀND TRÉJON [10] WAXTON FRÜZDA ÀND NOCHTA THÉR NW VRLÉREN SEND. AMONG THA GÀRS.SÉDUM HÉDON WI NAVT ALENA. KÉREN. LJAVER ÀND BLÍDE MEN ÁK SWETE THÉR LIK GOLD BLIKTE ÀND THÀT MÀN VNDERA SVNNA.STRÉLA BAKJA [15] KVSTE. JÉRON NE WRDE NAVT NE TELATH HWAND THÀT ÉNE JÉR WAS ALSA BLÍD AS.ET ÔTHERA. Before the bad times came, our land was the most beautiful in Wralda. The sun rose higher, and there was seldom frost. On the trees and shrubs grew fruits and nuts, which are now lost. Among the grains, not only did we have ‘selected’, ‘preferred’ and ‘favorite’, but also ‘sweet’, which shone like gold and could be baked in the sun's rays. Years were not counted, for one was as happy as the other.
ANTHA ÉNE SIDE WRDON WI THRVCH WR.ALDAS SÉ BISLOTEN. HWÉRVP NÉN FOLK BUTA VS NAVT FARA NE MOCHTE NACH KVNDE. [20] ANDA ÔRE SIDE WRDEN WI THRVCH THÀT BRÉDE TWISKLÁND VMTUNAD HWÉRTHRVCH THÀT FINDAS FOLK NAVT KVMA NE THVRADON. FON OVIRA TICHTA WALDA ÀND OVIR IT WILDE KWIK. BY MORNE PALDON WI OVER ET UTER.ENDE [25] THES ASTER.SÉ BY ÉVIND AN THENE MIDDEL.SÉ. ALSA WI. BUTA THA LITTIGA. WEL TWELIF GRÁTA SWETE RIN.STRAMA HÉDON. VS THRVCH WRALDA JÉVEN. VMB.VS LAND ELTE TO HALDANE ÀND VMB.VS WIGANDLIK FOLK [30] THA WÉI TO WISANA NÉI SINA SÉ. THA OWERA THISSAR RIN.STRAMA WRDON TOMET ALGADUR THRVCH VS FOLK BISÉTON On one side, we were enclosed by Wralda's Sea, on which no folk but us had the means nor skills to fare; on the other side, we were hedged in by the broad Twiskland through which the Finda folk dared not come on account of the thick forests and the wild beasts. Where the sun rises, our boundary was over the extremity of the East Sea; where the sun sets,(1) our boundary was at the entrance of the Middle Sea. We thus had — besides the smaller ones — no less than twelve large freshwater rivers, given us by Wralda to keep our land healthy and to show our adventurous folk the way to his sea. The banks of these rivers we almost entirely inhabited by our folk,

(1) ‘Where the sun rises... sets’ — lit.: ‘in the morning... in the evening’.

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